Q&A: College Students

College Couple

  1. I got drunk last night at a party and hooked up with someone and had unprotected sex. What should I do?
  2. Do campus health centers do HIV and STD testing? How much does it cost? Will my parents know if I get tested?
  3. Where can I go to get condoms?
  4. What are the health risks of oral sex?
  5. What are the risks of anal sex?
  6. What’s the story on HPV vaccine? Should both guys and girls get it?
  7. I want to get tested for STDs and HIV but don’t want to do it at the campus health center. Where can I go?
  8. What’s the right way to use condoms?
  9. I’m a gay guy who is just coming out and wants to start having sex with other guys but I want to stay healthy. Any advice?
  10. How often should college students get tested for HIV and STDs?
  11. I got forced by a guy last night to have sex and I want to talk to someone about it. Who can I call?
I got drunk last night at a party and hooked up with someone and had unprotected sex. What should I do?

If you are concerned that you might have contracted an STD or HIV, schedule an appointment with a provider at your college health services to discuss testing options. Women who are not on other forms of contraception should always consider the possibility of becoming pregnant from unprotected sex as well.

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Do campus health centers do HIV and STD testing? How much does it cost? Will my parents know if I get tested?

Most college health services in Rhode Island will perform routine HIV and STD testing, but you can call ahead to find out for sure. Most testing is covered by student insurance or your parent’s insurance. Remember, if you are nervous that your parents will see the insurance claim, find out if your health services performs confidential testing! Often times, this mode of billing means you parents will only see generic “laboratory services” without specific names of tests. Other health services provide testing like HIV screening for free!

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Where can I go to get condoms?

Try to get in touch with college residential counselors to see if they offer condoms for free! Otherwise, you can always go to community clinics, like The Project, to get them for free, or go to your local pharmacy or drug store to buy them.

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What are the health risks of oral sex?

Oral sex in many forms can be a way to transmit diseases, which includes mouth to penis, mouth to vulva and also mouth to anus. Possible diseases that are known to be transmitted through oral sex include herpes, syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, hepatitis, and even HIV.

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What are the risks of anal sex?

Anal sex has similar risks as vaginal sex. In some cases the risk of disease transmission with anal sex is higher than with vaginal sex. Diseases that can be transmitted during anal sex include HIV, gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis, herpes and hepatitis B.

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What’s the story on HPV vaccine? Should both guys and girls get it?

Yes. Guys and girls up to 26 years of age can get the vaccine. This vaccine can help prevent genital warts. Talk to your doctor for more information about the vaccine.

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I want to get tested for STDs and HIV but don’t want to do it at the campus health center. Where can I go?

You can always go to any primary care physician in the area or you may want to consider geting tested at The Project.

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What’s the right way to use condoms?

Every time! Most importantly, condoms should be used every time you have sexual intercourse, whether it be anal or vaginal . Be sure to check the expiration date and be sure to avoid spermicidal or multiple condoms. There is no problem with using lubricated condoms, but only put the lube on after the condom is on. Try to use water-based lubricants as well. Make sure to store them in a cool dry place (you can put them in your wallet, but not for long periods of time!). Once you have an erection, open the condom wrapper with your hands (not your teeth!), unroll it over the top of your penis while squeezing the top. Roll it down the shaft as far as you can. After ejaculating, make sure to hold the base of the condom as you pull out. Check out this condom fact sheet for more info.

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I’m a gay guy who is just coming out and wants to start having sex with other guys but I want to stay healthy. Any advice?

If you are just coming out and choose to become sexually active, now is a good time to develop some good habits to keep yourself healthy.  Here are some suggestions:

1) Before things get too hot and heavy in the bedroom, talk to your partner about his HIV status.  It good way to start this conversation is by saying, “As far as I know, I’m HIV negative and I always practice safe sex.  Can you tell me about your feelings about safe sex?”

2) Avoid having a guy ejaculate inside your mouth or anus.  Always use a condom as a top or bottom during anal sex and use lots of lube.

3)  If the lights are on, check out your partner’s body, especially his penis, for any rashes or sores.

4) Find a doctor your can trust and let him know you are a gay man and that you are sexually active.  It’s important to get regularly screened for HIV and STDs.

You may also want to check out the Men2MenRI website for more information.

 

 

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How often should college students get tested for HIV and STDs?

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) currently recommends getting tested at least once a year for those who are sexually active and every 3 to 6 months if you have multiple partners.

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I got forced by a guy last night to have sex and I want to talk to someone about it. Who can I call?

You need to talk to a trusted adult – a parent, a relative, a college health clinic provider, or college counselor. Another option is to contact a counselor at Sojourner House - they have trained staff that helps individuals who are being forced to have sex or are in abusive relationships.

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